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Historically Informed Performance: Exclusive or Inclusive?,
United_Kingdom

Walter Reiter

Historically Informed Performance: Exclusive or Inclusive?

Research Paper – Friday 24th September – 20:00-20:30 (CEST)

Walter Reiter

BIOGRAPHY

Walter Reiter graduated from the Royal Academy of Music in London and continued his studies in Israel with Prof. Rami Shevelov, who later took over Galamian’s chair at The Juilliard School, and in Germany with Prof. Sandor Vegh. Having studied towards a master’s degree in Violin Pedagogy with Prof. Felix Andreiewsky (former assistant of Prof. Yankelewitch in Moscow) he completed his studies with Prof. Piotr Bondarenko, who had been David Oistrakh’s assistant in Moscow.
After devoting himself to the intensive teaching of talented children at the Rubin Conservatory of Music in Jerusalem, his love for the music of the Baroque period brought him to the study of “authentic” performance practice on period instruments. Internationally recognized as a leading Baroque violinist, teacher, leader and conductor, he is Professor of Baroque Violin and Viola in the Royal Conservatory of The Hague and at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance in London and the author of “The Baroque Violin & Viola – a Fifty Lesson Course” published in 2020 by Oxford University Press.

Historically Informed Performance: Exclusive or Inclusive?

A generation ago, “Historically Informed Performance” (HIP) was a concept cherished by eccentric musicians hovering on the fringes of the musical establishment. The unfortunate rift that appeared between those whose ideal it was to conjure up distant sound worlds through the use of authentic instruments played in an informed manner and those to whom the distinctive sounds of period instruments was puzzling (or even abhorrent!) is fortunately in the process of healing. Violinists Isabelle Faust, Alina Ibragimova and Nicola Benedetti and cellist Stephen Isserlis are among the many who now perform on gut strings with ‘period’ orchestras while the influence of HIP on the playing styles of today’s orchestras is clear. Teachers preparing the younger generation for a career in music do not need to become specialists, but neither can they turn their backs on this reality. In my lecture I shall propose to my colleague’s positive ways of approaching HIP.