)">
The Impact of Recording Technology in Formal and Informal Learning.,
United_Kingdom

Heng-Ching Fang

The Impact of Recording Technology in Formal and Informal Learning.

Lecture – Sunday 26th September – 11:30-12:00 (CEST)

Heng-Ching Fang

BIOGRAPHY

Heng-Ching holds a PhD in Music (2009) from the University of Leeds, a Master of Music from the Guildhall School of Music (David Takeno & Jack Glickman) and a Postgraduate Diploma from the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire (Rivka Golani). During her doctoral candidature, she was the recipient of two awards: The British Federation of Women Graduates Scholarship (BFWG) and a Music and Letters award (Oxford Journals).
Her book “The Twentieth-Century Revolution in String Playing: A Practice-Based Study” was published in 2009. Her translation book, “Classical and Romantic Performing Practices 1750-1900”, by Clive Brown, was published in 2012.
She gave lectures at the ESTA conference (2020), the International Viola Congress in Poland (2019), and in Australia (2008). She taught viola at the University Malaysia Sabah (2016). She is the prize winner of the Leeds Chamber Orchestra Soloist Competition, a finalist in the Ludlow Philharmonic Prize Concerto Competition, the First Prize in the Taipei West District Viola Competition and third-prize winner of the National Viola Competition.

The Impact of Recording Technology in Formal and Informal Learning.

Thomas Alva Edison’s phonograph is the first invention of recording technology in human history. This technology quickly changes the way music is heard, learnt and produced. Through listening to our and others’ playing, recording technology evokes a self-examining progress. Furthermore, the reproduction of recordings, or indeed the development of twentieth-first century digital technology accelerates the interchanges of information and globalization. The influence continues to affect modern education, both in formal and informal learning. With easy access to information, the learning progress could become more effective but could have its potential downsides. This lecture discusses the origin of recording, and the impact of recording practice in musical performances, and how recording technology affects the teaching and learning progress in modern days. This lecture will also explore the psychological factors, social integration, and cognitive process in performance under the influence of recording technology.