)">
Music in Motion: Video-Dance Projects Created in Collaboration by the Dance and Cello Studios of UFMG.,
USA

Elise Pittenger (ASTA)

Music in Motion: Video-Dance Projects Created in Collaboration by the Dance and Cello Studios of UFMG.

Research Paper – Sunday 26th September – 13:00-13:30 (CEST)

Elise Pittenger

BIOGRAPHY

Elise Pittenger is cello professor at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), where she also coordinates the Chamber Music program and directs the Cello Ensemble, GruVi.
Through her research projects she explores Brazilian repertoire for cello, both historical and contemporary, and she collaborates with current composers to promote new works for cello and cello ensemble.
Originally from Baltimore, USA, she moved to Brazil in 2010 to join the Orquestra Filarmônica de Minas Gerais; from 2011 to July 2015, she was Acting Principal Cello of this orchestra.
Elise has a doctorate in musical performance from McGill University (Canada) where she worked with cellist Matt Haimovitz, and a master’s from Rice University (EUA), where she studied with Norman Fischer. Elise also holds a bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Yale University (EUA).
She has broad experience in both orchestral and chamber music and has an especial passion for performing contemporary music.

Music in Motion: Video-Dance Projects Created in Collaboration by the Dance and Cello Studios of UFMG.

In this lecture I present and discuss a series of video-dances created in collaboration between the cello class and the dance program of UFMG (Federal University of Minas Gerais). In the short term, this project was a response to the suspension of in-person activities this year, but it reflects a larger interest in the artistic and pedagogic possibilities of collaborations between these two areas. The lecture includes selections from videos developed within four projects during 2020 – 2021. I will describe the creation of the videos, which involved collaboration and exchange between students from the two areas. The work demonstrates the benefits of experiential, non-curricular projects within the scope of music education (in this case university level). We were able to deal with the demands of distance learning through the use of video technologies and the non-centralized nature of the projects, enabling students to engage independently with the material.